Category Archives: Literary Translation

Melbourne Emerging Writer’s Festival free event: Collaborative Translation and Poetry Workshop.

21 Jun 10:00 AM. At State Library Victoria, Experimedia 

Curious about translation, but don’t know where to start? Poetry translation is often thought of as an impossibly specialised craft, but approach it creatively and it becomes an inclusive and inspiring practice.

In this collaborative, hands-on workshop you will be teamed up with writers, visual artists and poetry lovers of various language abilities to tackle the translation of an ancient Chinese cí. The Transcollaborate team will walk you through the endless creative and linguistic possibilities for your translation project, and your masterpieces will be published in a zine.

Explore language, challenge your preconceptions, and be prepared to get creative! Open to visual artists, poets, linguists, and avid readers of all linguistic backgrounds.

Bookings essential: click here to book!

With Jessica Griffiths, Julia Min and Alice Whitmore

Literary context: Shakespeare and translation research

Italian Shakespeares

roma-shakespeare-iii

Early in 2016, Prof. Angela Tiziana Tarantini (Monash University) and Chris Griffiths completed an analysis of a 1924 Italian translation of Coriolanus and Julius Caesar. Their analysis addressed how the depiction of Rome in the translation of Shakespeare was used in support of fascist ideology in the early 1920s. The translation features a critical introduction by scholar Giuseppe de Lorenzo, which outlines a intriguing argument in which the Senecan ideal that Shakespeare found in the heroes of the Plutarch and Livy is held to be synonymous with the emerging fascist ideals of the period.

Their English translation of de Lorenzo’s essay is currently under consideration and will be published in the near future.

Literary Context: Julia Min and the poetry of Su Dongpo and Li Quinzhao

Special thanks to Julia (Xiaohong) Min (Monash University), who has shared and commented on her experience of translating poems by Su Dong-po & Li Quinzhao. Her responses will be valuable in developing our research further, and we look forward to her participation the future.

Min Xiao-hong.png

This collaborative project was undertaken with a multi-lingual, multi-disciplinary team in the 1980s. The work still fires Julia’s imagination, and she is keen to continue this type of translation project in the future.

Literary Context: Survey for Educational Psychology

by Jessica Trevitt

Dr Madeleine Bieg and I have completed a translation from German into English for Madeleine’s research in the field of educational psychology. Working via Skype between Germany and Australia, we met for one hour every week for four months; this was enough time to move through 155 items proposed for a survey of secondary school students. The survey is intended to investigate the students’ emotional attitudes toward their choice of subjects at school, and while it will be conducted using the original German items, our English translations will be used as the research team’s official translation for the purposes of dissemination in Anglophone contexts. We are in the final stages of finalising the target text, and will share more news once it’s ready for circulation!

Literary context: Shakespeare and translation research.

German Shakespeares

By Chris Griffiths

I am currently undertaking translations of German scholarship on the reception of Shakespeare. My current translation piece concerns the “controversial” translations of Hans Rothe in the twentieth century. This piece will be completed and submitted for publication by early 2017.

Dr Birgit Oehle and I have been investigating Dorothea Tieck’s nineteenth-century translations of Shakespeare’s sonnImage Sonnet 151ets. Tieck was the daughter of Ludwig Tieck, who, with August Schlegel, was among the most prominent of German translators of Shakespeare. Hers were the first full German translation of all 154 sonnets; the previous translator of the sonnets, Karl Lachmann, had omitted sonnets 134, 135 and 151 on the grounds that they were untranslatable (in relation to the two former) and obscene (in reference to the latter).

We may conduct our analysis of these pieces using Jessica Trevitt’s “triangulated” methodology, which attempts to deconstruct the “source-target” binary of mainstream translation studies by identifying other cultural forces that impact on translations processes. We may propose, for example, that the key cultural relationship of these translations was not between the source-English and target-German, but rather Germany’s reaction against French classicis, which prompted an embrace of the Germanic naturalism of Shakespeare.