Monthly Archives: June 2019

Special Journal Issue: Collaborative Translation

mtm: A Translation Journal. Special issue: Collaborative Translation. Volume 10, 2018.  Edited by Jessica Griffiths and Christian Griffiths. ISSN 2645-0312.

mtm cover cropped

TransCollaborate is proud to announce the publication of a special journal issue on the topic of collaborative translation, appearing in the translation journal mtm, and edited by our own committee members Jessica Griffiths and Christian Griffiths.

The special originated at our international symposium on collaborative translation, held in Prato, Italy in July 2017. All of our presenters and attendees were invited to submit articles or translations. We were fortunate enough to receive seven full length articles, and four translations.

We have attached the contents page here.

This special issue is a significant accomplishment for TransCollaborate, as it represents our largest research output to date, and moreover provides an important resource for future work in the field of collaborative translation.  We hope that it will provide a touchstone for all of those within our network who wish to explore and experiment with our collaborative methodologies.

All TransCollaborate members will receive a PDF copy of the special issue. To become a member, join here.

 

Chinese-English collaborations 2019

TransCollaborate’s activities this year have brought us into contact with Melbourne’s many Chinese communities, including both migrant and international-student cohorts. We have found many ways to connect with these communities through collaborative translation.

Marco Polo workshops

One of our closest partners, the Marco Polo project, has been facilitating weekly language exchange workshops since 2011. These workshops match Chinese-English bilinguals, including international students and native English learners of Chinese, to translate prose texts from Chinese into English. We have been given the opportunity to run our own Marco Polo workshops, applying our own unique methodology.

Following in the spirit of our previous Emerging Writers Festival workshop, our Marco Polo workshops translate the “Ci” of Su Dong Po. Our workshops involve the participation of several “target collaborators” with little-to-no experience with Chinese, but who have experience in translating creative texts in various contexts. Each target collaborator facilitates a small group to translate a Ci, marshaling input from collaborators with different language backgrounds and creative skills.

One group’s translation can be found here.

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Classroom collaborations

EAL students of the Australian Technical Management College in Melbourne Australia recently undertook collaborative translation with their trainer. The source texts are taken from a Chinese textbook featuring texts of 300+ words on a range of general topics. 

Translation 1

The first text to be translated covered the story of the historic satellite link between Shanghai and Toronto, Canada on the night of the new millennium, January 1st 2001.

You can find the translation here.

Translation 2

The next text was a magazine article about the Chinese lottery. The article investigates people’s expectations of winning the lottery, and what they would intend if they actually won.

You can find the translation here.

Method and outcomes

The collaborations take place between a class of pre-intermediate students, all Chinese speakers, and their trainer, a native-English speaker. The translations take just under 90 minutes. The process is usually energetic, and it clearly activates the students, who otherwise may struggle to express themselves in the classroom. The translation offers multiple opportunities to teach and illustrate grammar and vocabulary.

The feedback from these activities is positive, with all participants requesting copies of the completed translations, and with some asking if the exercise could be repeated in future classes.

This collaboration has confirmed or supported the following insights for TransCollaborate:

  • That collaborations with pre-intermediate students are possible, if the source text is sufficiently simple in grammar and vocabulary.
  • That collaborative translation is an excellent classroom activity for monolingual learner groups, as it productively integrates a range of language skills.
  • That an experienced target collaborator can collaboratively translate a text of around 300-400 words in a 90-minute session.

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